Team GB are heading home from Rio after the country's greatest ever overseas Olympic Games

Great Britain’s athletes are heading home from Rio after the country’s greatest ever overseas Olympic Games.

The heroes were all smiles at the Brazilian city’s airport today as they prepared to board a golden-nosed British Airways plane to London Heathrow.

Team GB smashed their target of 48 medals to make Rio 2016 the country’s best ever ‘away’ Games, and ended up with 67 medals – two more than London’s remarkable haul – to finish second.

Great Britain's athletes are heading home from Rio after the country's greatest ever overseas Olympic Games

Great Britain’s athletes are heading home from Rio after the country’s greatest ever overseas Olympic Games

The heroes were all smiles at the Brazilian city's airport today as they prepared to board a golden-nosed British Airways plane to London Heathrow. Pictured is boxer Nicola Adams who retained her title

The heroes were all smiles at the Brazilian city’s airport today as they prepared to board a golden-nosed British Airways plane to London Heathrow. Pictured is boxer Nicola Adams who retained her title

World record breaking swimmer Adam Peaty, 21, who kick-started the medal rush at the airport in Rio before their flight

World record breaking swimmer Adam Peaty, 21, who kick-started the medal rush at the airport in Rio before their flight

Pictured is Heather Oliver and Kirsty Gilmour, who represented Team GB in the badminton events in Rio de Janeiro

Pictured is Heather Oliver and Kirsty Gilmour, who represented Team GB in the badminton events in Rio de Janeiro

The British Airways plane, with a gold nose, waits for the Team GB heroes at the airport in Rio de Janeiro to take them home

The British Airways plane, with a gold nose, waits for the Team GB heroes at the airport in Rio de Janeiro to take them home

After winning the hearts of the country with their sporting heroics, Team GB’s gold medal-winning athletes were treated to a first-class ticket home.

Yet as the elite group crosses the skies – presumably sipping from a glass of complimentary champagne – you may want to spare a thought for their teammates not carrying a medal.

For despite their best efforts, Team GB athletes who failed to finish in a podium position will have to watch their teammates sit down to a business class seat as they languish in economy.

The group of 270 athletes and officials will arrive at Heathrow this morning where a huge welcome is expected after Team GB specially chartered a fleet of British Airways planes.

But in a light-handed snub, or perhaps an incentive for the Tokyo Games in 2020, officials said upgrades had only been offered to medal winners.

The group of 27 gold medal winners was given priority when it came to allocating first class seats.

Pictured is Team GB's silver medallist Joe Joyce, who gave up cheerleading to become a boxer and also has an arts degree

Pictured is Team GB’s silver medallist Joe Joyce, who gave up cheerleading to become a boxer and also has an arts degree

Team GB smashed their target of 48 medals to make Rio 2016 the country's best ever 'away' Games, and ended up with 67 medals - two more than London's remarkable haul - to finish second

Team GB smashed their target of 48 medals to make Rio 2016 the country’s best ever ‘away’ Games, and ended up with 67 medals – two more than London’s remarkable haul – to finish second

After winning the hearts of the country with their sporting heroics, Team GB¿s gold medal-winning athletes were treated to a first-class ticket home

After winning the hearts of the country with their sporting heroics, Team GB’s gold medal-winning athletes were treated to a first-class ticket home

Among them were world record breaking swimmer Adam Peaty, 21, who kick-started the medal rush and rower Helen Glover, a double Olympic champion.

Nicola Adams, the first woman to retain a boxing title, and divers Chris Mears and Jack Laugher, were thought to be among those lapping up the extra legroom in their high-end seats.

But athletes who finished in second or third place had to settle for slightly cheaper seats and were expected to take positions in business and premium economy seats.

At the airport check-in yesterday however there appeared little sign of animosity or suggestions that the separation was a form of sporting ‘apartheid’.

Instead the group was seen amidst a logjam of thousands of athletes, officials and supporters exiting Brazil, prompting advice being issued to leave six hours before flight time.

But athletes who finished in second or third place, like Katherine Grainger (pictured) had to settle for slightly cheaper seats and were expected to take positions in business and premium economy seats

But athletes who finished in second or third place, like Katherine Grainger (pictured) had to settle for slightly cheaper seats and were expected to take positions in business and premium economy seats

Athletes who finished in second or third place had to settle for slightly cheaper seats and were expected to take positions in business and premium economy seats. Pictured is long jumper Jazmin Sawyers with Union Flag guitar

Athletes who finished in second or third place had to settle for slightly cheaper seats and were expected to take positions in business and premium economy seats. Pictured is long jumper Jazmin Sawyers with Union Flag guitar

Officials denied the separation of the athletes was an issue, instead saying it was a ¿gesture¿ that recognised the achievements in Rio where GB took a record 67 medals

Officials denied the separation of the athletes was an issue, instead saying it was a ‘gesture’ that recognised the achievements in Rio where GB took a record 67 medals

Officials denied the separation of the athletes was an issue, instead saying it was a ‘gesture’ that recognised the achievements in Rio where GB took a record 67 medals.

It was a contrast to the reaction before the Games began when some athletes spoke out against being made to travel in economy while others went in Premium Economy and Business calling it a ‘Class Division.’

It was unclear whether Kate Richardson-Walsh, the captain of the triumphant women’s hockey team and Team GB closing ceremony flagbearer, was among those in first class.

It is understood that the majority of the hockey squad, whose penalty shootout win over Holland in Rio captivated the nation watching on their TVs at home, were in business for the overnight 11-hour flight home.

Several of Britain’s gold medal winners had already left Rio, including double tennis gold medallist Andy Murray and golf champion Justin Rose.

Golden cyclists Sir Bradley Wiggins, Jason Kenny and his partner Laura Trott, who became the first woman to win four golds for GB, had also left the country.

The cost of the charter is unclear but one-way First Class tickets from Rio to London later this month were selling for £3,832 yesterday.

Several of Britain¿s gold medal winners had already left Rio, including double tennis gold medallist Andy Murray and golf champion Justin Rose

Several of Britain’s gold medal winners had already left Rio, including double tennis gold medallist Andy Murray and golf champion Justin Rose

Upgrades on the flights out had been left to the athletes to pay themselves although sponsors and individual sports chose to travel business

Upgrades on the flights out had been left to the athletes to pay themselves although sponsors and individual sports chose to travel business

Team GB athletes leave Rio to head back to London Heathrow after a successful 2016 Olympic Games

Team GB athletes leave Rio to head back to London Heathrow after a successful 2016 Olympic Games

Team GB’s rowers all flew out in business, while their coxes and support staff flew economy. Team GB’s Rugby Sevens flew business class.

Upgrades on the flights out had been left to the athletes to pay themselves although sponsors and individual sports chose to travel business.

A total of 15 athletes are believed to have been given business class seats by British Athletics, but it said flying all 366 athletes out in upgraded seats would have cost £2million. Olympic Association sources said this would have been unaffordable.

Each sport decides how their athletes fly out to Rio, with control over its own individual budget, but the British Olympics Association is solely responsible for funding Team GB’s participation in the games.

The British Airways flight BA2016 that carried Team GB back to Heathrow was decorated with a gold nose and the name ‘victorious’ on its livery.

The Boeing 747 ferried 270 athletes and support staff – as well as pole vaults, javelins bicycles and a 6.7 metre sail.

Appropriately, the flight was loaded in Rio with 77 extra champagne bottles and treats for team members, who will be offered a three-course menu

Appropriately, the flight was loaded in Rio with 77 extra champagne bottles and treats for team members, who will be offered a three-course menu

Britain collected 27 gold, 22 silver and 17 bronze medals. China picked up more medals than Britain with 70 but with 27 of them gold and only one more athlete left to compete, the nation cannot overtake Team GB

Britain collected 27 gold, 22 silver and 17 bronze medals. China picked up more medals than Britain with 70 but with 27 of them gold and only one more athlete left to compete, the nation cannot overtake Team GB

Traditional rivals such as France, Germany and Australia were left trailing as Britain became the first country ever to improve its medal tally after hosting the Games.

Traditional rivals such as France, Germany and Australia were left trailing as Britain became the first country ever to improve its medal tally after hosting the Games.

Appropriately, the flight was loaded in Rio with 77 extra champagne bottles and treats for team members, who will be offered a three-course menu. 

Britain collected 27 gold, 22 silver and 17 bronze medals. China picked up more medals than Britain with 70 but with 27 of them gold and only one more athlete left to compete, the nation cannot overtake Team GB. 

Traditional rivals such as France, Germany and Australia were left trailing as Britain became the first country ever to improve its medal tally after hosting the Games. 

Pictured is Team GB's Lutalo Muhammad who finished with a silver medal in the taekwondo event in Rio de Janeiro

Pictured is Team GB’s Lutalo Muhammad who finished with a silver medal in the taekwondo event in Rio de Janeiro

Adam Peaty, who kicked off the gold rush for Great Britain gives the thumbs-up to the camera at the airport in Rio

Adam Peaty, who kicked off the gold rush for Great Britain gives the thumbs-up to the camera at the airport in Rio

The medal total was Britain¿s highest since 1908, when events included deer shooting, tandem racing and the tug of war

The medal total was Britain’s highest since 1908, when events included deer shooting, tandem racing and the tug of war

Whitehall sources last night indicated that most of the stars who have kept millions glued to their screens late into the night will be recognised in the New Year¿s Honours

Whitehall sources last night indicated that most of the stars who have kept millions glued to their screens late into the night will be recognised in the New Year’s Honours

The total was Britain’s highest since 1908, when events included deer shooting, tandem racing and the tug of war.

Whitehall sources last night indicated that most of the stars who have kept millions glued to their screens late into the night will be recognised in the New Year’s Honours.

They are expected to include: runner Mo Farah, who is likely to be knighted after electrifying the nation again in the 5,000 metres; Max Whitlock, who secured Britain’s first and second ever golds in gymnastics; and cyclist Laura Trott, whose superhuman efforts were singled out for praise by Prime Minister Theresa May.    

Source link – Post in Catelogy Champions League M88